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20100901
20100930
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the 2010 senate and house races. with me ispublisher. jennifer duffy and david wasserman also looking at house races. thank you very much. guest: it is the first time we've done anything altogether on television before. host: give us the macro picture of what we're looking at. i have heard that the demand -- the dems will keep the house and know they won't keep the house. guest: it is looking tougher and tougher. if you look at it from a macro, top-down perspective, it looks like it's going to go republican. the race by race count is not quite there. david will go into much more of the micro political, but from the national perspective, when you take in and turn out how independents are swinging and all these dynamics, it is looking tougher for democrats to all gone to the house. my hunch is that they are going to come up short. host: it was said on friday that they're going to cut out, -- he did not say the executive like that, but it looks like dems might cut out here. guest: it is looking like certain people probably cannot be saved and these people can save themselves over here wi
conversations] >> a look ahead at the midterm elections as charlie cook joins senate editor jennifer duffy. they talk about the congressional and gubernatorial races. beginning at 8 eastern. the senate california race with the first debate between barbara boxer and republican candidates carly fiorina. >> there is nothing about finance that is like a rocket science. this is the most frustrating thing. the biggest ponzi scheme for wall street is telling someone who has worked really hard to earn about that they are not smart enough to understand how that is going to be invested. >> meredith whitney was the first to predict losses for lehman brothers. she's our guest on "q&a". >> the president spoke today in the rose garden after the august jobs report came out. >> good morning, everybody. as we head into liberty weekend, i know many people across this country are concerned about what the future holds for themselves and their families and for the economy as a whole. there is no quick fix for the worst recession we have experienced since the great depression. the truth is it took years to crea
organization focused-driven was established in january by jennifer smith to attended the distracted driving summit after losing her mother in a tragic car crash in 2008, caused by a driver talking on his cell phone. modeled after the highly successful mothers against drunk driving. focused estrogan is the first destructive driving the victim'' advocacy organization. state and local government strengthen regulation and enforcement of these of hand- held devices while behind the wheel. . is banning text messaging while driving. taking a further. it builds upon the past successes of similar campaigns like click it or take it. most importantly, the american public is truly beginning to recognize the very real danger posed by cell phones and other distractions behind the wheel. the secretary of the size over and over again that all distractions are a threat to roadways 60. getting the word out has the greatest impact on this issue because no law or organization can be as effective as the driver making the right choice. in the grand scheme of things, 12 months is really not that long of the time,
to be with you today. what a beautiful place. i told jennifer and rick that it is very distracting trying to save the country from a place like this where god's beauty is all around and you have such wonderful people and so many fun things to do instead. i am so proud to be here and be invited by jennifer and rep. what a great organization they have to help you and i saved this country. thank you for your time today. thank you for coming. thank you for thinking with us. i ask you to bear with me as i speak to you little bit and then ask questions. then i will be out of your hair and on to the next speaker you will have. i am honored to see karen angle at the front table. what an honor. how many remember the famous coups that laid the golden egg? a man and his wife owned a very that lays golden eggs that made the couple very rich. the man's wife said that if we could have all of the golden eggs inside, we could be richer than ever. the husband said that she was right, we would not have to wait for the goose to lay her eggs every day. the couple killed her and cut her open only to find she was like
it another way. anything else? yes, sir. >> good afternoon, my name is jennifer ross and i'm with the noise destructive driving prevention team and i'm a senior in high school. my comment about the previous questions are, a few of the other high schoolers and i have used this phrase throughout the day as a designated texter. whenever i'm driving, whoever is in the car with me they are a designating texter. otherwise i don't text in the car, it's not me. it's someone else doing it. i think it would be a marketable term. that's what i would like to ask you. a designated texter and that's what you call it. and it is more so of being able to -- it's not negligencely using your cell phone that we are addicted to. it's the communicating to our friends and family members. that's what we are not letting go so easily. so having that designated texter, like a designated driver in the alcohol campaign that we have all been embeded in our brains, you have a designated driver if you're going to do any of that stuff. ever since we have been little. in elementary school and stuff. we just transferred it t
a long discussion before the program started. during that conversation, jennifer, dave and judy convince me that we should create a group like mothers against drunk driving. the idea would be a national advocacy group devoted to ending distracted driving. that was born in the studios of cnn. during the year since, jennifer, dave, judy and other members have travelled the country doing important and inspiring work, putting a human face on a terrible problem. at last year's summit, we learned that distracted driving is an epidemic. it is an epidemic because everyone has a cell phone, and everyone thinks they can use it while driving. you all know this. if i asked for a show of hands -- which i am not going to do [laughter] -- i know that everyone of you has a self done. and i also know that everyone has used it while driving. do not deny it. we are hooked on it. that is why it is an epidemic. there is no bigger distraction than people on a cell phone or people texting and driving. there is not. you cannot drive safely doing that. i want to say a special word of thanks to the chief of polic
mentors who were open. jennifer was one of those people. it is people like jennifer that i am now giving vice to others. take risks, be loyal, have a sense of purpose and help other people. thank you. flu >> if you want to reach me afterwards, my email is mblake at whp.eop.gov. if you need anything else from us, go to wrous.gov. the young people go to healthcare.gov. you can stay on your parent's health plan until age 26. that is critical in communities right now. a few things, one, go visit the white house booth upstairs. it's just a train. it's not the coming of jesus right now. folks out here looking around right now. booth 309 is the booth. we ask them to be ambassadors of change. i think we've heard a lot. i want to put it in this context how we have started. these are the things we have been waiting for. thises beautiful from our end. a packed room. people who have been here since 9:00. realize the name of the group that has us here, impact. it's not just showing up. what are you going to leave and do? i want you to realize a consequence in action. in a few weeks, they're will be a
the program started. during that conversation, jennifer, dave and judy convince me that we should create a group like mothers against drunk driving. the idea would be a national advocacy group devoted to ending distracted driving. that was born in the studios of cnn. during the year since, jennifer, dave, judy and other members have travelled the country doing important and inspiring work, putting a human face on a terrible problem. at last year's summit, we learned that distracted driving is an epidemic. it is an epidemic because everyone has a cell phone, and everyone thinks they can use it while driving. you all know this. if i asked for a show of hands -- which i am not going to do [laughter] -- i know that everyone of you has a self done. and i also know that everyone has used it while driving. do not deny it. we are hooked on it. that is why it is an epidemic. there is no bigger distraction than people on a cell phone or people texting and driving. there is not. you cannot drive safely doing that. i want to say a special word of thanks to the chief of police of washington, d.c. she
machines have a trail. it is a state, when jennifer brunner came into office, she made a real commitment that there were options for voters to vote on paper. host: jan on the republican line, good morning. caller: i want to tell ms. goodman that he keeps talking about the nuns who cannot vote. my mother was born in alabama and she has never had a troubled voting in arizona. you picked arizona as a bad place to vote. the other thing i would like to know t-- who finances you? who pays for all of this? you go after different states. who pays for your time doing this? guest: people like yourself. as a membership organization and you can go online -- it is a membership organization and you can go online, commoncause.org. we were founded 40 years ago and most of our lights were turned onlinepeople going and giving donations. we're not funded by corporations -- host: government? guest: no, not the government. it is a citizen advocacy group. that is where our firepower comes from. when we stopped and small donations from the folks like you, the lead -- would allow -- when we stopped getting smal
of the beast. it borders every middle east country. host: let us go to jennifer. democrats line. atlanta, georgia. caller: good morning. my issue is that i believe that both this war and afghanistan is going to continue until we have a draft. host: are you still with us? caller: unless we get other kids over there besides low income and middle income family kids, we are just going to be over there indefinitely. host: ok. looking at some of the other stories that are in the news right now. from "the philadelphia inquirer" talking about a special event that happened yesterday. tribute to aaron and slain -- airmen slain. a photograph of him in service and we see the president giving it to mr. etchenberger on behalf of his late father. russell is on our independent's line. caller: good morning. these wars of occupation, america, we have to stop. you don't win a war of occupation. you either leave and go home and you stay and people slowly die. host: what do you think should happen? caller: we need to wrap up there as quickly as possible, with a losing as few people as possible. and double th
there is an amendment to that agreement by the end of next year. host: last question is from michigan, jennifer on the republican line. caller: yes, congressman. i'm a little bit confused. i have a son who his career military so i it supports the military. he was part of the mission to find saddam hussein and i'm very proud of him. i would not have him any other way. i raised him to be a proud american. he did two tours in iraq, came home, did a tour in afghanistan, came home safe, with posttraumatic stress disorder. no doubt getting ready to go back to afghanistan. what in the world are we going to do here? they are putting us in there and failed, rushed us in there and failed. what can we hope to accomplish with all that -- host: thank you. we will pause there, because we understand the question. guest: first of all, thank you so much for the service of your son. i believe the military today is the most extraordinary this country has had in its history in terms of the young men and women who served in the armed forces. i think in afghanistan that achieving the level of stability that afghanis
. >> jennifer grant haholm from michigan. a good piece of this comes from a program which allows our automotive suppliers to go to a bank and have access to loans that otherwise might not have had because of the crunch on credit. it allows them to be able to invest in machining, to diversify and move into areas like medical devices or alternative energy. the bottom line for michigan and for all of the states, and certainly for the businesses, is that this means jobs. michigan's program was very small and will now be significantly more robust. state programs will be able to create or maintain 11,000 jobs, $800 million worth of credits that will keep people employed in michigan and make business is stronger as the move to this difficult time. this is a great bill for us. hopefully it is a great bill for the people who are working for these businesses or will be working for these businesses. i am thrilled to be here and say thank you to the president for signing this bill that gives people opportunity. >> my name is stephen neal. i would like to think the president for the stimulus package as well
you can do, but i am so proud to be invited by jennifer and rich, and what a great organization they have to help us save this country, so thank you for your time. thank you for coming, and i would ask you to bear with me as i speak a little and ask some questions, and i will be on to the next speaker, who is of the front table. what a pleasure. >> how many of you remember the goose that laid the golden egg? just think, they said, if we did have all the gold eggs, we could be richer than ever. the couple cut to reduce open, only to find she was like every other goose. they would have no more golden eggs. i know i am speaking to the choir, but our friends, co- workers, and neighbors have had a false hope that america would continue to be our golden goose. we have paid too little attention to the founding principles that made this country great. we know to affect them and say, they have used government to hurt the principal of free enterprise. they have looked up short-term profits. we could go on and on. we are all guilty of taking it for granted and looking for the short term pa
and the monitoring -- and monitoring is affected, and we engage outside experts to do that. governance -- jennifer mentioned that. when we purchased our hospital a year ago, the first board meeting, the first action item was what is the compliance plan going to be for this year and you will be back here in six months to tell us how you're doing. with that kind of support from the board, it can be very effective. our university is governed by a board of trustees and our board of trustees received a regular report directly from the chief compliance officer has to our self monitoring and our activities and our findings. patients -- i want to describe something we established early on with sanctions. if you do not apply sanctions, it will be an ineffective program. i am proud to say that it is the health side of that are in big is the most frequent calls. we get reports that are sent to us research interests and, i have no clue. have someone who is an expert at this teaches have to do this. or new proposals and complex rules that are coming out. those phone calls come in and we work with our constitue
: that's jennifer stefano and she talked about the way a lot of people looked at the republican class and the republican revolution of 1994 and there was so much hope for them. and what happened is the republicans didn't reduce spending. in fact, spending continued to go up. and so when she -- when she talked about barack obama, what she's saying is -- and the republicans, the debt is such -- is at such a level that her child is going to be paying for it. . caller: in the past, i have usually seen democrats and republicans at odds. usually, we try to come together. i have faith that we all want the same solutions. we want to get there in a different way. ever since the election of obama, it is frightening me quite a bit from the standpoint that we have the sarah palin movement. we have the tea party movement. i am saying all of this disconnect with the glen beck who has a nasty and violent town and he was just destructive. he comes out and calls a rally to go back to god. you heard the one congressman who screamed," you lie." are we all going crazy? as a democrat, i support democratic
jenny or jennifer? just call me jenny, y. you and where are from, jenny? >> i am 26 years old and i am , iowa. >> what do you do for a living? a youth the center and i teach yoga twice a week. i am taking a couple of online class is to get into a bigger program next fall. >> staff sgt, what did your family say when they heard you were picked for this honor? how did they react? proud, and have said so my whole life. tying my shoes made them proud. riding my bike without training proud. they are very proud parents, and was one more thing. they were proud when i went into the army. they are always going to be proud of me. they have said that. very proud. i do not have another word for it. am having a hard time articulating how they feel. >> can you tell me what is your most enduring impression of the two deployments you spend in afghanistan? my most enduring impression two deployments are the quality of people that continue to lead afghanistan time again, and how they do something most people will not do, and then they're willing to do it again. my most enduring thought is how tough the g
on the outlook of elections tonight as charlie cook joined senator, jennifer duffy and david wasserman. they talk about house, senate and gubernatorial races. that begins at 8:00 p.m. eastern. falling that at 9:00 p.m. eastern, the california senate race between incumbent barbara boxer and republican candidate carly fiorina. >> tonight, "book tv" primetime looks to the stars. >> join our conversation on the american revolution, the making of the constitution and the importance of its historical study sunday with pulitzer prize winner gordon wood on "book tv's" in depth. that will begin at noon eastern on c-span2. >> now the annual labor briefing from the afl-cio. speakers include afl-cio president richard trumka. this is about 50 minutes. >> first, we will go to remarks and then open it up for questions and answers. i would like to introduce afl- cio president richard trumka. >> good morning and thank you all for joining us. this is a defining labor day for working people and the kickoff to the final round of defining a set of elections. we will rebuild a fundamental economy the values of hard wo
the president has departed. thank you. ♪ ♪ [applause] >> jennifer grant hall from michigan, thrilled the president signed this. a good piece of it is from the program in michigan which allows for our automotive suppliers to go to a bank and now have access to loans. allows them to be able to invest in machines and to diversify and maybe move into areas like medical devices or alternative energy. the bottom line for michigan and for all of the states and certainly for the businesses is that this means jobs. michigan's program which was a very small and will now be significantly more robust has aided in that the state programs will be able to retain 11,000 jobs. credit being put into the system to keep people employed in michigan and to keep making these businesses stronger. it is a great deal for the people working for these businesses or who will be working for these businesses. i am thrilled to be here. but mostly i say thank you to the president for signing this bill that gives people opportunity. >> my name is stephen neal, here locally. i would like to thank the president for the
on this legislation, are karen pell strause, jennifer simpson, eric bridges, mark rickert, larry goldberg, steve ross teen of the perkins school, mike fester of the carroll school, incredible advocates and the conscience of this, why we're here. i thank all who worked on this legislation. i urge an aye vote and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass senate 3304. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition? mr. markey: i move that the house suspend the rules and agree to s. 3828, an act to make technical corrections to the 21st century communications and video accessibility act of 2010. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will repo
to that agreement by the end of next year. host: last question is from michigan, jennifer on the republican line. caller: yes, congressman. i'm a little bit confused. i have a son who his career military so i it supports the military. he was part of e mission to find saddam hussein and i'm very proud of him. i would not have him any other way. i raised him to be a proud american. he did two tours in iraq, came home, did a tour in afghanistan, came home safe, with posttraumatic stress disorder. no doubt getting ready to go backo afghanistan. what in the world are we going to do here? they are putting us in there and failed, rushed us in there and failed. what can we hope to accomplish with all that -- host: thank you. we will pause there, because we understand the question. guest: first of all, thank you so much for the service of your son. i believe the military today is the most extraordinary this country has had its history in terms of the young men and women who served in the armed forces. i think in afghanistan that achieving the level of stability that afghanistan is not used as a basis of
the human rights protections of the constitution's in this country. jennifer will discuss a little bit about what is happening across the country. >> good morning, everyone. i want to make mr. conyers for bringing us all together to talk about these very important issues. i have been asked to talk about racial profiling in the context of emigrants. there have been many waves of american history in which there have been anti-democrat laws and policies, but that the federal and state and city level. starting about five years ago, there has been a more recent wave, and states and cities across the country started proposing and enacting laws that were essentially designed to make life very hard for emigrants and to try to drive them out. in the last five years the state legislators have enacted reject proposed thousands of anti- immigrant laws. -- who have proposed thousands of anti-democrat loss. one of those mentioned here was the pennsylvania law, which is a law that prohibited undocumented immigrants from granting and restricted employment as well. there have been similar laws all across the
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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